Technical Disclaimer 

The MR2 Owners Club and its respective owners, editors and contributors make no representations about the suitability of the information contained in the documents, materials and related graphics published on mr2oc.co.uk  

By entering this site, you hold this site and it's affiliates not legally responsible for any damages due to advice given here. This site and it's affiliates takes no responsibility for consequences of any actions that arise from advice given. Any opinion is given with information provided by you and can not be taken as absolute.

All repairs should be undertaken by a competent and qualified technician. By using this site, you understand and agree that all advice given and followed are at your own risk and do not hold this site or it's affiliates responsible for any damages.

Knowledge Base - Info:- Electronic Brake Force Distribution

This was available as an optional extra on the MK2, photos have been supplied by "trevsmr2" and added here as a reference for other MR2 owners.




Following text is taken from here CLICKY

Quote::
As per SAE technical paper #920646 - Buschmann et al. "The job of the EBD as a subsystem of the ABS system is to control the effective adhesion utilization by the rear wheels. The pressure of the rear wheels is approximated to the ideal brake force distribution in a partial braking operation. To do so, the conventional brake design is modified in the direction of rear axle overbraking, and the components of the ABS are used. EBD reduces the strain on the hydraulic brake force proportioning valve in the vehicle. EBD optimizes the brake design with regard to: adhesion utilization; driving stability; wear; temperature stress; and pedal force."

EBFD works in conjunction with ABS to minimize yaw accelerations during turns. It compares steering wheel angle to a yaw sensor. "Yaw" is the vehicle's rotation about its center of gravity (imagine a car spinning out of control). If the yaw sensor detects more/less yaw than the steering wheel angle should create - the car is understeering or oversteering - EBFD activates one of the rear brakes to rotate the car back into its intended course. The sensors are so sensitive, and the actuation is so quick that the driver doesn't notice it working - or how close he/she was to spinning out and hitting something!

For example, if a car is making a left turn, and begins to understeer (the car veers to the outside of the turn) EBFD activates the left rear brake, which will turn the car and make the car point left.




Todd

Copyright © by MR2 Owners Club All Right Reserved.

Details

Created : 2011-10-06 12:22:17, Last Modified : 2011-10-09 13:51:18

User Comments